What I’m On The Hunt For at Garage Sales in 2018

This year I’m on the hunt at garage sales in my neck of the woods for a few things.

So far this year I’ve been to a garage sale, yes only one.  It was the last day of the sale and pretty much picked over but I am upping my game for next weekend’s garage sales.  Part of preparing for the next sale is making a list of what I need/want.

Since I don’t have an outlet for reselling my found treasures,  I am looking for things that work in my house.  My family room is undergoing a bit of a refresh so new (to me) things to decorate the built-in bookcases are at the top of my list.  So vintage decorative items are a must.

Vintage leather-bound books are high on my list of desired items.   I would like to replace some of the books that are now on the shelves.

My plan is to display my collection of vintage clocks and cameras on the built-in bookshelves so adding to those collections is a priority.

 I love to change out the lamps in my rooms often and I built up a bit of a lamp stash; however, my lamp stash dwindled over time by lamps disappearing into my daughters’ homes.  So I need to rebuild my lamp stash.

Baskets for both decor and organization are always on my list at garage sales, thrift stores, and estate sales.  I don’t believe you can have too many baskets and the ones with handles always come home with me if reasonably priced.  They are just so versatile and add warmth and coziness to your home.

Tablescaping is one of my favorite pastimes.  I love using vintage items to create tablescapes that are functional and beautiful.  Vintage linens, china, and curiosities are on my garage sale list.

This list is by no means complete but these are things I am actively looking for this year.

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What I’m On The Hunt For at Garage Sales in 2018

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Sharon

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A Vintage Find ~ Mahjong Game Set

The last time I visited my daughter in Florida I found a vintage Mahjong game at Goodwill in Delray Beach.

I almost missed it because it was sitting in a big pile of junk.   At first, I thought it was a vintage blue travel case or suitcase.

So I was a bit shocked when I opened the case and found all these Chinese game tiles.  I am unfamiliar with Mahjong but there was a faint light going off in my brain about a Chinese game but I couldn’t remember the name or anything about it.  It was only $5 so I took a chance on it.

Game experts generally agree that Mahjong evolved near Shanghai in the mid to late 1800’s.  The game quickly caught on in Shanghai and Beijing.  The earliest surviving Mahjong tile sets date to around 1870 and were acquired in Fuzhou, Shanghai, and Ningbo.

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 Imported to the United States in the 1920’s, Americans soon discovered its enjoyable intellectual challenge.  The first Mahjong sets sold in the U.S. were sold by Abercrombie & Fitch starting in 1920.  It became a success and the co-owner of the company, Ezra Fitch, sent emissaries to Chinese villages to buy every Mahjong set they could find.  Abercrombie & Fitch sold a total of 12,000 game sets.

 A set of Mahjong tiles usually has a minimum of 136 tiles even though 144 tiles are common.  Sets from the United States or Southeast Asia usually have more tiles.  My set has 152 tiles and five trays.  Both the trays and the tiles are bakelite.

Even though both skill and chance play a fundamental role in the game, there isn’t a shortage of superstitions in which players believe where they sit, how they hold their pieces or objects they have on their person somehow affect the outcome of the game.

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Sharon

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Vintage Fascination No. 144 ~ April

Welcome friends to Vintage Fascination No. 144 for the month of April.

I enjoy sharing my favorite vintage finds with you once a month so much.

My daughter and I spied this vintage salt and pepper shaker set at almost the same time.  She is probably going to take this set since they are larger than most of the sets in my collection.  The bears are adorable but have no markings.

Do you check out the basket aisle at the thrift store, I always do?  I have found some great baskets on the cheap that way.  On this trip, I found four vintage rectangular wood berry baskets with green banding.  They aged to perfection with excellent patina.  Not sure exactly what I am going to do with these little baskets but they are going into my Christmas crafting stash for now.

This past weekend my oldest daughter and I went to two estate sales in our area.  One was just around the corner at the home of a local pharmacist that owned his own drug store for years before the big guys came to town.   He had a great choice of old pharmacy bottles but they were quite pricey.  There were a few antiques but they were priced at retail and really nothing appealed to me except a white metal drug cabinet but it wasn’t for sale.

We left there empty-handed and moved on to another estate sale on down the road a couple of miles.  It was the home of a couple who spent quite a lot of time in the Orient.  We didn’t buy much but I came away with a metal pencil-case that I love.  From walking around the house the couple had quite varied interests in art, music, and had quite an extensive library.  A lot of the art and books were not for sale.  My daughter bought a copper bracelet and a trinket box.  The trinket box is hand painted depicting our solar system.  The artist signed the bottom of the box.

I came away with a Wallace Motif pencil box.  The Wallace Pencil Company began manufacturing wooden pencils in St. Louis in 1915.  By 1979 it sold 120 million pencils per year.  Before the 1950s, they packaged some of these pencils, such as its Motif line, in metal tins.  Dixon Ticonderoga acquired Wallace Pencil Co. in the 1980s.  My sweet little pencil box is full of Van Dyke colored pencils, all nicely sharpened.

A New York souvenir tray found its way into my shopping cart one day at Goodwill.  A couple of years ago I one of these trays in a magazine in someone’s cabin.  It was their home state.  I loved that idea so I have a Georgia tray just waiting for a cute little cabin or condo to hang it in.  This New York tray displays all the famous landmarks that you would expect but a few not so famous ones too.  These state trays can be very educational too.  Like did you know the State Flower of New York is the Rose both wild and cultivated?

I have bought and sold several citrus reamers over the years but this is the first Hazel Atlas Crisscross pattern lemon reamer I’ve found.  It is depression glass and made prior to 1938 when Hazel Atlas discontinued the Crisscross pattern (source Ruby Lane).  The juicer came in three sizes.  This example is the smallest reamer of the three at 5 1/2 inches in diameter.  It’s a keeper.

You may recall that I already have a fruit strainer on a stand but try as I may I could not leave this strainer behind.  I think it looks like a witch’s hat, so don’t be surprised if I come up with a junk witch for Halloween this year.

This black and gold tole tray is not in the greatest shape but I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it.  This beauty is a vintage metal Nashco Tole round tray featuring a pretty cabbage rose bouquet in yellow and creams,  The tray is black with gold accents.  It still has the original Nashco foil sticker on the bottom.  The tray has a bit of paint loss, a little rust, and some dents evidencing its true vintage condition.   It will join the other Tole trays in my rear stairwell.

There was two 1970 era plastic thermos on the shelf at the thrift store this week.  I bought them both without thinking twice.  One is a quart blue striped thermos.  It has a handle and a spout top.  It is the first thermos I’ve found that has a spout top feature for pouring or sipping.   The other thermos is green with a beige top and stopper but it is devoid of a glass liner (no photo).  Even though disappointed that the green one thermos isn’t complete I can use the top and stopper on other thermoses in my collection.  In fact, both already found a new home not sure what to do with the green shell of a thermos.  Any suggestions?

Non Vintage

To my knowledge, this adorable red plaid tote bag isn’t vintage.  It does not have a label giving me any sign of maker or age.  It is very well made and it stole my heart as soon as I saw it hanging in the thrift store.

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Sharon

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A Vintage Mason Jar Vase on Re-Purposed Cabinet Door

My Craft Room De-Stash for April is a farmhouse project~a vintage mason jar vase on a re-purposed cabinet door.

Every month a group of bloggers is challenged by C’mon Get Crafty to create a new craft or project from their own stash of goodies! Check out some awesome creations you might be able to make from your own stash! #CraftRoomDestashChallenge

If you’d like to join in the Craft Room De-Stash Challenge, you can request to join our Facebook group here!

All the supplies for this farmhouse style project came from my stash except for the fresh flowers.

The first order of business is to clean the cabinet door.  It is a bit dusty from being stored in the garage.  After a thorough cleaning, I painted the cabinet door with two coats of Waverly Plaster chalk paint.  I lightly distressed the door with sandpaper.  A hook attached to the cabinet door and inserted through the twine holds the jar in place.

Since I wanted to protect the vintage Mason jar I wrapped jute twine around the top of the jar.  The jute twine protects the top and provides a way to hang the jar on the cabinet door.

By using a hook to hang the jar to the cabinet door and not a fixed attachment allows me to display other vintage goodies on the re-purposed door.

cabinet door

For instance, a pretty patterned creamer reflects a charming cottage/shabby chic look.

Thank you for joining me today and be sure to visit a Welcome Spring Link Party for some wonderful Spring inspiration or to share a Spring related post.

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There are a few more days until the party closes on April 19th and on the 23rd all the co-hosts share their favorites from the party.

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Sharon

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Vintage Fascination No. 143 ~ March

Welcome friends to the March edition of Vintage Fascination.

Here is what I found in the last few weeks.

 A Mirro Cooky-Pastry Press and Decorator Set in the original box.  The box includes all the discs (12) and tips (3) and the instruction booklet which includes instructions for use and recipes.   The box shows the “Good Housekeeping” seal of approval and the original sales price of $4.79 at Davison’s Department Store.

 The set doesn’t seem as if it has ever been used or only light use.  I wrote a mini-history of Davison’s Department Store here.

The Happy Birthday note was on the back side of a 1960’s style calling card.

Four dark aqua blue fishing floats were a surprise but happy find.  I love using fishing floats to decorate during the summer.  So you will be seeing these soon in a beachy vignette.

I can never resist a wooden bowl and this one is really pretty.  It has a scalloped top edge but it does not have a trademark.  It is pretty rough shape so a makeover is a strong possibility.

 I spied a pretty little silver plate teapot sitting on the shelf at Goodwill.  It is Gorham hollowware in their Newport pattern marked YB89.   I found it on Replacements.com but they had very little information about the teapot.  The handle isn’t original but a rustic replacement which matches the overall condition of the teapot.  The original handle was bamboo giving the teapot an Asian look.

White ironstone is always a happy find.  This pretty little platter is Knowles marked USA 53-1.   It is small only six inches long.

Jello molds are a staple in my craft stash and I rarely pass them up at thrift stores.  They are great to have on hand for projects.

On a quick trip to Goodwill, I found this pretty salad plate.  It was only a dollar and I could see it in a sweet vignette with a glass dome covering something special.   The pattern is Eastbourne (Old English) by Johnson Brothers who discontinued the pattern in 1949.

These adorable poodle salt and pepper shakers came home with me from a very bizarre antique/thrift store.  It is a combination antique and thrift store.  The front of the store was a series of rooms with antiques in each one displayed in a haphazard way.  Then in the back of the store was a large room and it was full of salvaged new appliances, building materials, and general brick-a-brack.  I picked up several things but only came away with the poodle salt and pepper set.   Nother had a price so you had to negotiate with a fellow sitting on a stool out front by the door.

When I saw these four leaf salad plates I knew they were going home with me.  Do you remember back in January when I shared five green Bordallo Pinheiro plates with you in Vintage Fascination No. 141 Part 1?  Don’t you think these salad plates will look great with the Bordallo Pinheiro plates I found in Florida?

Vintage for March

The salad plates have a brown border that gives them a distinctive look.  The trademark on the bottom of the plate reads J Willfred, A Charles Sadek Import Company Inc.,  Made in Portugal.  I found plates in the same pattern online accredited to Bordallo Pinheiro.

Non-Vintage Item for March

Napkins are always on my radar and this month I hit the jackpot twice.  First, I found four Vera Bradley napkins that seem to have never been used.  They are from the retired Java Blue pattern.  I immediately recognized the pattern in the thrift store since my youngest daughter had several Vera Bradley items in the Java Blue pattern.  I still have a Java Blue paperweight she left when she moved out.

Last week I saw a brown Toile pattern in the linens and went to investigate.  When I pulled the little bundle out it was six brown Toile napkins in lovely condition.   They are now freshly laundered and ready to use.

Thank you for joining me today and be sure to visit a Welcome Spring Link Party for some wonderful Spring inspiration or to share a Spring related post.  The party is open until April 19th and on the 23rd all the co-hosts share their favorites from the party.

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Sharon

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Vintage Collecting No. 9 ~ Jadeite

  Welcome friends to Part 9 of my ongoing series about vintage collecting ~ Jadeite.

My Jadeite collection is not huge by any means but I enjoy it, especially adding to it.  Most of it is vintage but I do have a few reproduction pieces.

Six salad plates in Fire King Jane Ray pattern and a pretty little art deco vase also by Fire King.

This stand is holding Fire King Jane Ray salad plates (7), dinner plates (2), cup and saucer, creamer and sugar bowl.  On top is a Fire King Lotus plate and a hen on the nest (reproduction).

The piece not already identified is a small reproduction cake plate.

My collection has two cups but only one saucer.  As you can see in the photo of the cake plate above I paired a Jane Ray cup with a pretty china saucer.

The salt and pepper shaker set is reproduction.

I love this hen on the nest even though it is a reproduction.

This nesting mixing bowl set was my first Jadeite purchase back in 2005.  This set is the swirl pattern made by Fire King between 1949 and 1962.

My newest piece is a second Fire King lotus plate that I scored it for a dollar at a favorite thrift store.

Once I made the decision to collect Jadeite and began to hunt for it locally, I quickly realized there is very little Jadeite to be found here.  I check the antique malls and stores often but most of my collection is from Etsy and eBay.   The two Lotus plates are my only local purchases.

Here are a few ways I use my collection:

A Valentine’s Day Tea Party

Dining Room Corner

These two reproduction cake plates stacked on each other is one of my favorite looks.

Jadeite

Kitchen Necessities

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Jadeite

Be sure to see Vintage Collecting: Parts 1-8

 1~Misc.

 2~Misc.

 3~Misc.

 4~Misc.

 5~Blue Transferware

Part 6~Trophies

 7~Ironstone Platters

8 ~ Flower Frogs

 

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Sharon

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Vintage Fascination No. 142 ~ February

Vintage Fascination No. 142 seems like a long time coming.

It is the middle of February already and this year looks like it is going to fly by.

This three-tier rose cake serving stand from Japan is in lovely condition.  Each plate has gold edge rims and the pole’s color is also gold.  The three-tier cake plate is 10” tall the top plate is  4 1/12”, the center plate is 6 1/12” and the bottom plate is 8 1/12” in diameter.

You know I’m a Blue Willow fan and just couldn’t resist these seven plates at Goodwill.  These vintage plates have a stunning transfer ware pattern in blue, set on an antique white background and measure 9″ across.  They are in good vintage condition. These unmarked plates have a Blue Willow pattern similar to some other pieces I have from Japan.

I’ve never seen a Spode Christmas Tree metal tray before so I snapped it up.  The bonus: it was only 99 cents.  I’m adding it  to my Spode Christmas Tree collection of accessories.

This next item speaks to me.  It is a deep aqua color glass insulator from an electric pole.  In my previous life, I worked for a public electric utility so when I see these glass insulators they like to come home with me.  I have several.   This one is a Hemingray-42 made in the USA.

Cookie cutters are always on my radar and when I saw these large vintage copper cutters I knew they would come home with me.  In the past I found a few small copper cookie cutters but these large ones are fantastic.  Not sure what I will do with them but for now I’m hanging on to them.

This crystal salt and pepper shaker set made of thick crystal glass have stoppers in the bottom.  This sleek design gives them a very elegant look.   This set with a thumbprint design is truly lovely.  These are most likely from the 1970’s.

Fire King Wheat is one of the most recognized patterns produced by Anchor Hocking.  Produced from 1962 to 1966, it was a popular pattern. This beautiful Wheat creamer and sugar set is in excellent condition.  There are hardly any indications of use.  I already have a few pieces of this pattern.

My small collection of old bottles did not include a blue Bromo-Seltzer bottle until recently when I found this little beauty.  This cobalt blue bottle embossed Bromo-Seltzer, Emerson Drug Co.Baltimore, MD originally had a screw on cap.  It advertised that it was “an aid for the pleasant relief of minor stomach upset, nervous tension, and headache” and “effervescent antacid – analgesic compound”. It also provides relieve for “neuralgia”.  What the heck is neuralgia?

Vintage Inspired Item

On a recent trip to Bargain Hunt I spied this Vintage Charm Spot On 3 Piece Mixing Bowl Set, inspired by the 1967 New Dots pattern by Pyrex.  For $12 they hopped in my buggy. 

The nesting bowl set includes 3-cup, 6-cup and 10-cup mixing bowls.  They are microwave, freezer and dishwasher safe.  I love them.

UPDATE

A question came up regarding the trademark on the bottom of the bowls.  They can be distinguished from the original Pyrex bowls by the trademark on the Vintage Charm bowls.  The trademark clearly states that this set of bowls is inspired by Pyrex.

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Vintage Fascination No. 142 ~ February

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Sharon

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Common, Unique and Curious ~ Vintage Salt and Pepper Shakers

Common, unique and curious is how I would describe this little collection of eight vintage salt and pepper shakers.   I found them recently at an estate sale.

My daughter convinced me to start a collection of vintage salt and pepper shakers so I am going to share these with her.  They are a great collectible since they are colorful, quirky, inexpensive, and don’t take up a ton of room.

A pair of sitting donkey salt and pepper shakers fit into the quirky category.  They make me want to laugh when I look at them.  Their bottom stamp simply says Japan.

These adorable grey and white cows also from Japan have cork stoppers.  A similar set listed on Etsy is $24.95 which is more than I paid for all eight sets.

A set of googly eyed moose salt and pepper shakers are hysterical.  I couldn’t believe it when I picked them up and their eyes jiggled around.  Also from Japan a similar set on Etsy were $10.00.

The super cute mushroom salt and pepper shakers are from the Gift World of Gorham and made in Japan.

The brown cow salt and pepper shakers carry the Otagiri 1982 trademark.  Otagiri describes a variety of stoneware from Japan that was widely sold in souvenir outlets and department stores on the West Coast from the 1950’s.  In 1980 they registered their trademark in the U.S.  A set from 1981 was $28 on Etsy.

The little squirrels are the cutest salt and pepper shakers I’ve ever seen and are my favorites from this group.  They are also from Japan and have cork stoppers.  One has a repaired ear but who ever fixed it did an excellent job.

Santa’s boots are a set of salt and pepper shakers from 1978 Enesco and made in Japan.

shakers

Santa and Mrs. Claus made by Lego in Japan are charming and round out this group quite well.

I noted that two of the sets have cork stoppers.  Does anyone know if this helps date the sets?  Most of the sets I found on Etsy with cork stoppers were 1960 and earlier, but I wonder if that is correct.  If anyone knows, please drop me a line.

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Common, Unique and Curious ~ Vintage Salt and Pepper Shakers

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Sharon

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Isn’t It a Little Early for Tulips?

Isn’t it a little early for tulips?

It is a little early here in Atlanta for tulips.

At least that is what I thought until these beauties arrived at my door.  I’m always on the lookout for vintage Fire King at a good price.  So when I saw this set in good vintage condition and priced well on Etsy, I didn’t hesitate too much.

The set consists of three nesting splash proof bowls.  The largest is 9 1/2 inches wide and the other two bowls graduate down in size to 7.5 and 6.5 inches.

There seems to be a bowl missing between the largest bowl and the next smaller size bowl.  So now I’ll be on the hunt to make this set complete with an 8 1/2 inch bowl.

Now a little history from Vintage Fire King 101: A Guide to Fire King Kitchen Ware.

“Vintage Fire King dinnerware and glassware products were first produced by the Anchor Hocking Glass Corp. based in Lancaster, Ohio. In 1942, in the hopes of cornering a fresh market for affordable and attractive cookware, Anchor Hocking Glass began producing their now-famous line of oven-proof, low-cost, low-expansion borosilicate glassware products. The company branded their new line of ‘classic-American’ glassware pieces as “Fire King,” thus solidified their name in the history books as a contender for the kitchen ware demographic.

The beautiful mid-century modern designs come in a variety of styles, colors, shapes and sizes. Fire King style kitchen ware was made with durability in mind. While vintage collectors of our age might create shrines in hutches and cupboards all across America, the regular consumer from that era actually used Fire King branded products much like we use pots and pans in our own homes today. Used for baking, the storage of food, sauces, liquids and extensions of their buyer’s personality, Fire King became a household name until production stopped in 1976.”

Last Saturday was National Tulip Day in Amsterdam.  It is an annual event held in January each year that preludes the tulip season in the Netherlands.  In celebration my local grocery store had an abundance of tulips for sale.  A bunch found its way home with me.

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Isn’t It a Little Early for Tulips?

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Sharon

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Vintage Fascination No. 141 ~ Part Two

Welcome friends to Vintage Fascination No. 141~Part Two.  Today, I’m sharing more Delray Beach vintage finds.

These are from the Goodwill and the Habitat Restore both of which are on Federal Highway in Delray Beach.

I found an ironstone platter that carries the Johnson Brothers trademark.  It has the bull in a china shop trademark which Johnson Brothers began using in 1980.  The trademark does not indicate a pattern name.

An engraved vintage Community silver-plated baby cup is joining my growing baby cup collection.  It has an engraving for Erica Suzanne’s birthday 6/24/76.   The patina on this little cup is lovely.

 The cup handle is a Community flatware pattern but I don’t know which pattern.  If you recognize the pattern, please let me know.

From Restore’s silver offerings I found this mini champagne bucket which serves as a toothpick holder.  It is silver-plated but is not trade marked.  It is so charming with the little lion heads on each side.

A plaid tin that previously held Land of Burns Scotch Shortbread caught my eye.  When I picked it up it was extremely heavy and when I opened it a bunch of nails spilled out.  Nails re-donated, tin stored with Christmas decorations.  I cannot find any info on this tin, if you know anything about it, please let me know.

Two small creamers sitting on the shelf next to each other were just too cute together.  The larger one is by Buffalo-Oneida and the smaller one is by Hall.  Made in the USA these two little ironstone creamers are most likely restaurant ware.

Vintage Inspired Item

When I first picked up this little round cotton Battenberg lace tablecloth I was sure it was vintage; however, it isn’t.  It is a Martha Stewart product with a new looking tag.  Even though it is new, I see a lot of uses for it.

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Thanks for joining me today!  If you missed Part One see it here.

Always

Sharon

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